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Top Stories

How to choose a career

  • Saturday, October 29, 2011
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  • How to choose a career is an extended free article that will provide you with lots of great tips on how you can choose your ideal career. If you are having trouble choosing a career, then please read this article that will give you our top 3 tips when it comes to how to choose a career. Please also take the time to come back as we will be adding new valuable resources and articles on how to choose a career. For many of us, finding a career that we deem fun and long-term is in itself a long journey. But having a successful career in life is not just for the rich and famous, it's also for the average person, like you!

    We as humans are prone to look at successful individuals like Oprah or Bill Gates and assume that somehow they became wealthy and innovative overnight, but it truly took many years, time, effort, and perseverance. There are three important points to address when asking the question, what career is right for me?

    Firstly, you must discover what are those standing and lasting values that make you who you are. What things interest you or what things make you want to stop as soon as you begin. Choosing a career is all about you, because if you don't know who you are as an individual, it's going to be extremely hard to convince your potential employer to entrust you with a job.
    For some of us, we value our families and the ability to schedule work around life or for some it may be the need to work around certain types of people, rather than others. Whatever those values and ideals fit you, you must be comfortable with yourself and willing to try new things!

    Secondly, you must figure out what you are good at and what brings out the best of your abilities. Obviously, if you are great at painting artwork, but really can't stand working outside in the scorching heat, then you probably don't want to apply for a job as a car mechanic. There are many ways to figure out what you are good at, simply just by asking yourself what are your likes and dislikes, your expectations for your dream career, and what steps you would have to take to get there. Whenever someone comes up to me and complains about their job and how they dislike it so much, I always ask why you are still doing it. Work in a field that fits your mold and who you are, not based on pay or some other factor.

    Thirdly and most importantly, do something you love! Never get lured into doing a job that makes you grumpy and angry at the world. There are too many career positions out there waiting for someone with your talents to come aboard. Happiness in career and life to me is one of the most vital issues we should all cherish as human beings. Being happy is not only good for those who spend the most time with you, such as your spouse, kids, or friends, it's also good for your health, happiness, and well-being. Like I said before, a great career is not just for the rich and famous, it's for all of us. Some of us have wealthy parents and can just inherit money or work for them, while others have to work their hardest to earn a decent living. But whatever the case may be, your dreams and goals can come true in life, no matter your age, race, or any other factor. Just remember to set goals, aim high, and never give up! You have to be willing to be an innovator and a visionist in your quest to find that dream career. In the words of Robert Byrne, “The purpose of life is a life of purpose.”
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    Behaviour and discipline in school

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  • Each school's head teacher is responsible for promoting good behaviour and discipline. He/She must draw up the school's discipline policy, using the governing body's statement of general principles as a framework. The head of school must publicise the discipline policy. They may do this by making it known within the schools and to parents, and by bringing it to the attention of students, parents and staff at least once a year.The policy should be regularly reviewed, taking into account the views of students, parents and staff. Essential elements are strategies to tackle bullying and racial harassment, and the school's policy on detention. Overall, the policy should:
    .....

    1-promote self-discipline and proper regard for authority among students
    2-encourage good behaviour and respect for others
    3-ensure students' standard of behaviour is acceptable
    4-regulate students' conduct
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    Exam Techniques, Tips and Tricks

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  • 1) Revise actively.

    Just reading through your notes is the worst possible way to revise. Well, OK, perhaps not the worst possible, but it’s really not very good. The more of your brain you can engage in the revision, the more you will remember. Memory is not a box in one part of your brain that things are either in or out. Memory is spread out everywhere: there’s verbal memory, visual memory, audio memory, muscle memory, all sorts. The more your brain does with the information, the more you will remember.

    So don’t just read. Make up poems and mnemonics. Summarise the notes. Set them to music. Extract key points and write them down yourself somewhere – even if you’re just copying them out, this is better than just reading, since more of your brain is involved. Make up quizzes and do them. Write limericks. Above all – do problems. Make up your own if you run out. Get active!

    2) Plan revision.

    Write a good revision plan, and stick to it. Don’t do just one subject a day, you’ll get tired of it; then again swopping too often means you don’t get the chance to get deep into anything. I used to do mornings on one subject, afternoons on another and evenings on a third.

    3) Do past papers – as many as you can lay your hands on.

    The internal web has (at least) the last three year's papers on it. Papers from previous years are stored in the library (at least that used to be true - it's worth checking if they still have them). Work through them. If you can't do a question, check that it is still in the syllabus (the modules change every year, and it's always worth checking what is new). With a good revision plan you should be doing nothing in the last week before the exams except working through exam papers and examples sheets making sure you can do them.

    I can’t emphasise the importance of this enough. Anyone who doesn’t work through past papers has very little chance of doing well in an exam.

    Oh - and do the past papers, and the examples sheets, against the clock. Time is short in an exam, you need to get used to thinking, and writing quickly. Get your hand trained up so it can write fast (but legibly, please).

    4) Question-spotting.

    This can be risky, but if you're playing the percentages it's worth a try. Look for any topic that was in the exam two and three years ago, but not last year. If you can get hold of papers from further back, try and spot patterns: does any topic come up every other year, for example?

    Another good tip is to make a very careful note if the lecturer says at any point "this is new in the course this year". If he does, there's an above average chance that this will be in the exam - it gets harder every year to come up with new questions about the same old subjects, and putting a new topic in the course is an easy "new question" for the examiner.
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